portugueseidiom

To say that you’re having a field day is an American idiom meaning you’re enjoying yourself. In Portugal, feeding the donkey sponge cake means to give good treatment to those that don’t need it.

Find out more below.

 

Idioms are things we say that have meanings unrelated to the words being used. For example, to say it’s raining “cats and dogs” is an idiom meaning it’s raining really hard. The words cats and dogs have nothing to do with the measurement of rain, yet it’s used to describe heavy rain. This makes that phrase an idiom.

Idioms are tricky because if you haven’t heard a certain one before, it may be difficult to understand what it means.

The website Hotel Club created some images to show us what idioms are being used across the world and their meanings.

spanishidoim

 

russianidiom

 

japeneseidiom

 

italianidiom

 

germanidoim

 

finnishidiom

 

frenchidiom

 

danishidiom

credit: mashable

 And now here are some idioms we use in America:

Pulling your legBeing dishonest simply as a joke

Cry WolfTo falsely alarm others

When pigs flyTo describe something that will never happen

Break a legTo wish someone good luck (commonly used in the performing arts)

Apple of my eyeUsed to describe someone who is very important to you

Hold your horsesTo tell someone to be patient

On the fenceWhen someone has not decided

Feeling under the weatherFeeling sick

  • THIS IS FUNNY (4)
  • THIS IS COOL (3)
  • JUST YUCK (2)
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